Do I need a building consent?

A Building Consent is a formal approval granted by the Council which confirms the proposed building work shown in the documentation you provide complies with the New Zealand Building Code, the Building Act 2004 and Building Regulations.

In some cases, a Resource Consent or specific requirements of the District Plan may be required to be met under the Resource Management Act 1991. If you are unsure whether the building work you are proposing, requires a Resource Consent or meets District Plan requirements, please contact the Planning Department on (0800) 422522.

A Building Consent is required for most building work, this includes alterations and additions and includes the following:

  • structural building - additions, alterations to existing buildings and demolition
  • new buildings
  • decks, platforms or bridges more than 1.5 metres above ground level
  • retaining walls higher than 1.5 metres
  • plumbing and drainage work
  • relocating a building
  • changing the use of a building
  • installing a fireplace or air conditioning system
  • fences or walls higher than 2.5 metres
  • swimming or spa pools and their associated fences/safety barriers
  • sheds with a floor area greater than 10 square metres.
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As a building owner, you are responsible for ensuring any exempt building work complies with the Building Code and that it doesn't breach any other Act.

Although the work may be classed as exempt under the Building Act, other approvals such as resource consent may be required under the Resource Management Act 1991. If you're not sure about other approvals, please phone us on 0800422522 and talk to one of our planners.

There are exceptions where a Building Consent is not required. See our Exemptions Page for more detail.

NOTE: The information on this website is not all inclusive, for full information regarding Building Consents please contact the Council on 0800 422 522 or building.services@rangitikei.govt.nz or info@rangitikei.govt.nz

It is also important to note that other legislation such as Resource Management (National Standards for Air Quality) Regulations 2004 and Smoke –Free Environment Act 1990 requirements may place further obligations to be complied with by building owners.

It is also important to note that other legislation such as Resource Management (National Standards for Air Quality) Regulations 2004 and Smoke –Free Environment Act 1990 requirements may place further obligations to be complied with by building owners.

Building on land subject to natural hazards It's important to consider any natural hazards that could be present on the land when undertaking any building work. Natural hazards include: • erosion (including coastal erosion, bank erosion and sheet erosion) • falling debris (including soil, rock, snow and ice) • subsidence • inundation (including flooding, overland flow, storm surge, tidal effects and ponding) • slippage.

The Building Act allows, depending on the circumstances, the consent to either be refused or granted subject to a condition that a natural hazard notification is placed on the title. This notification warns future property owners of the potential hazard and reduces the liability for the council. We'll discuss with you the refusal or notification process if this relates to your project. (Section 71-74 of the Building Act 2004)